zuriuma5:

Tommy white tank appreciation
Part II 
Photos courtesy of THAAC zuriuma5:

Tommy white tank appreciation
Part II 
Photos courtesy of THAAC zuriuma5:

Tommy white tank appreciation
Part II 
Photos courtesy of THAAC zuriuma5:

Tommy white tank appreciation
Part II 
Photos courtesy of THAAC

zuriuma5:

Tommy white tank appreciation
Part II
Photos courtesy of THAAC

zuriuma5:

Tommy white tank appreciation 
part I
Photos courtesy of THAAC

zuriuma5:

Tommy white tank appreciation
part I
Photos courtesy of THAAC

tomhardydotorg:

Re:Art

I’ve been painting and drawing for years.. It’s part of getting creative energy out and partly about defining characters and the world in pictures, shape and colour, for me, symbols and numbers, images, characters.. I think and see in pictures. With drawing sometimes, It’s easier than explaining what I’m thinking sometimes to just draw a diagram or silhouette, I’m not an artist, it’s just that it’s a useful shorthand and outlet, for descriptive purposes and constructive development towards something I’m into.

Working out what works any means necessary. When I read a script, I see it in pictures, I often am surprised how incredibly off I am, when I get to set or when I see the directors, design vision, but there have been times, sometimes however, I’ve already seen the scene or rooms very similar in my head and the room, or characters stand there as it looked when I first read it. I read a script normally once and it comes to life, it’s how I smell out mistruth and opportunities, missed or captured, subjective to taste of course; it’s just how I approach a script or case file, the way that when you see a good movie once you could explain almost line for line to a friend what you just saw and why it’s so amazing they have to see it, so it’s not being lazy, I hope, that’s just how my head takes in information,  if I have to read a script more than once it’s either super complicated or it’s something I’m going to work out eventually a way into, somehow, not always though I’m no Einstein either.. Best laid plans and all-

Revisiting Tom’s artistic and creative perspectives

tomhardydotorg:

Rehearsals in pants with direction from Brian and Edgar Brothers
Ally as Fk m8 x

tomhardydotorg:

Poster’s note: Throwback Thursday ..Fractured heel sustained during fight scene on set of Legend last month

Poor thing! Hope it’s getting better with that boot.

tomhardydotorg:

Poster’s note: Throwback Thursday ..Fractured heel sustained during fight scene on set of Legend last month

Poor thing! Hope it’s getting better with that boot.

tomhardydotorg:

Legend onset Dog 2014

Coolness: Woody in da house!

Even the possibility of Tom Hardy portraying Marco Pierre Whyte actually happening is more exciting than anything I can muster ATM.
Love. This. Bit. Of. Fantastic. News!

LHC.

REVIEW: About The Devil in the Kitchen
Without question, the original rock-star chef is Marco Pierre White. Anyone with even a passing interest in the food world knows White is a legend. The first British chef (and the youngest chef anywhere) to win three Michelin stars - and also the only chef ever to give them all back - is a chain-smoking, pot-throwing multiply- married culinary genius whose fierce devotion to food and restaurants has been the only constant in a life of tabloid-ready turmoil. In The Devil in the Kitchen White tells the story behind his ascent from working-class roots to culinary greatness, leaving no dish unserved as he relays raucus and revealing tales featuring some of the biggest names in the food world and beyond, including: Mario Batali, Gordon Ramsay, Albert Roux, Raymond Blanc, Michael Caine, Damien Hirst, and even Prince Charles. With candid honesty and wicked humor, he gives us insight into what it takes to become a great chef, what it’s like to run a 3-star kitchen, and why sometimes you really do need to throw a cheese plate at the wall.
- See more at: http://www.bloomsbury.com/us/the-devil-in-the-kitchen-9781596919327/#sthash.0En9nQpb.dpuf

Tom Hardy to play Marco Pierre White in biopic?

July 31, 2014

Tom Hardy is keen to play real-life chef Marco Pierre White in the Hollywood film based on his best-selling book ‘The Devil in the Kitchen: Sex, Pain, Madness and the Making of a Great Chef.’

The 36-year-old actor is keen to star as the bad boy chef in the upcoming biopic, which is being directed by Ridley Scott, after bonding with White, 52, over the role.
A source told The Sun newspaper: “Tom and Marco have had a long dialogue about the movie.

"Marco’s given his blessing and thinks Tom is the only actor who can do him justice."

The movie is based on White’s memoir ‘The Devil in the Kitchen: Sex, Pain, Madness and the Making of a Great Chef’ and will depict his wild antics during the 1980s and growing up in a working-class British family.

The source added: “A lot of people thought Russell Crowe was the obvious pick but the movie will primarily be about Marco in his twenties and thirties.

"But Tom and Marco both have similar character traits, including coming from working-class backgrounds and can both be very intense about their work. It will be perfect casting."

The movie is also expected to star a character based on potty-mouthed celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay, 47, who Marco famously trained and fell out with in 2000.

George Miller put Mel Gibson on the cinematic map  a long time ago and gave the young actor an international introduction which set him on the road to fame and acclaim. George Miller has an eye for picking the right face for the right role. After years of experience and running his own race at all times in the film industry, Mr Miller has struck to his guns and selected the cream of the crop in today’s cachet of extraordinarily talented,  young actors. 

Tom Hardy has now been baptized as an action hero in the newly produced, post-apocalyptic, legendary “Mad Max” franchise with the first offering being the aptly titled Mad Max: Fury Road. 
Allow me to state here that after seeing and digesting the trailer the dusty, ‘kill or be killed’ world of the original Road Warrior, Max Rockatansky now belongs to Tom Hardy:  An extraordinary actor who elevates every film by his enormously visceral presence, sheer magnetism and uber-talent. 

LHC. George Miller put Mel Gibson on the cinematic map  a long time ago and gave the young actor an international introduction which set him on the road to fame and acclaim. George Miller has an eye for picking the right face for the right role. After years of experience and running his own race at all times in the film industry, Mr Miller has struck to his guns and selected the cream of the crop in today’s cachet of extraordinarily talented,  young actors. 

Tom Hardy has now been baptized as an action hero in the newly produced, post-apocalyptic, legendary “Mad Max” franchise with the first offering being the aptly titled Mad Max: Fury Road. 
Allow me to state here that after seeing and digesting the trailer the dusty, ‘kill or be killed’ world of the original Road Warrior, Max Rockatansky now belongs to Tom Hardy:  An extraordinary actor who elevates every film by his enormously visceral presence, sheer magnetism and uber-talent. 

LHC. George Miller put Mel Gibson on the cinematic map  a long time ago and gave the young actor an international introduction which set him on the road to fame and acclaim. George Miller has an eye for picking the right face for the right role. After years of experience and running his own race at all times in the film industry, Mr Miller has struck to his guns and selected the cream of the crop in today’s cachet of extraordinarily talented,  young actors. 

Tom Hardy has now been baptized as an action hero in the newly produced, post-apocalyptic, legendary “Mad Max” franchise with the first offering being the aptly titled Mad Max: Fury Road. 
Allow me to state here that after seeing and digesting the trailer the dusty, ‘kill or be killed’ world of the original Road Warrior, Max Rockatansky now belongs to Tom Hardy:  An extraordinary actor who elevates every film by his enormously visceral presence, sheer magnetism and uber-talent. 

LHC.

George Miller put Mel Gibson on the cinematic map a long time ago and gave the young actor an international introduction which set him on the road to fame and acclaim. George Miller has an eye for picking the right face for the right role. After years of experience and running his own race at all times in the film industry, Mr Miller has struck to his guns and selected the cream of the crop in today’s cachet of extraordinarily talented, young actors.

Tom Hardy has now been baptized as an action hero in the newly produced, post-apocalyptic, legendary “Mad Max” franchise with the first offering being the aptly titled Mad Max: Fury Road.
Allow me to state here that after seeing and digesting the trailer the dusty, ‘kill or be killed’ world of the original Road Warrior, Max Rockatansky now belongs to Tom Hardy: An extraordinary actor who elevates every film by his enormously visceral presence, sheer magnetism and uber-talent.

LHC.

tomhardyvariations:

From a new interview with George Miller in the September issue of Empire, available now!

Q: Where does this [film] fit into the series?
GM: I never devised a whole series of stories all that time ago, so you’d have to see it as a stand-alone film, but it has very strong references to the other three, and Mad Max 2 is the one that it refers to most.




MMFR: Maximum Force….and Strength, no doubt! tomhardyvariations:

From a new interview with George Miller in the September issue of Empire, available now!

Q: Where does this [film] fit into the series?
GM: I never devised a whole series of stories all that time ago, so you’d have to see it as a stand-alone film, but it has very strong references to the other three, and Mad Max 2 is the one that it refers to most.




MMFR: Maximum Force….and Strength, no doubt! tomhardyvariations:

From a new interview with George Miller in the September issue of Empire, available now!

Q: Where does this [film] fit into the series?
GM: I never devised a whole series of stories all that time ago, so you’d have to see it as a stand-alone film, but it has very strong references to the other three, and Mad Max 2 is the one that it refers to most.




MMFR: Maximum Force….and Strength, no doubt!

tomhardyvariations:

From a new interview with George Miller in the September issue of Empire, available now!

Q: Where does this [film] fit into the series?

GM: I never devised a whole series of stories all that time ago, so you’d have to see it as a stand-alone film, but it has very strong references to the other three, and Mad Max 2 is the one that it refers to most.

MMFR: Maximum Force….and Strength, no doubt!